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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
will become a one woman truth squad, and we will start tonight. >> i would like to ask her about civil rights. you have in the past been a supporter of to russian tax credits and also the constitutional amendment to ban a blessing. both of these are opposed not only by your running mate but just about every education in the country. now that you are mr. mondale's running mate, had to change your position on either of those? >> both mondale and i agree on the same goal, that is not discrimination. i just did not agree on the same direction he does on how to achieve it. i do not find any problem with that. that is something that has been handled by the court and not by him or congress. but we both support nondiscrimination and have seen and integration of neighborhoods as the goals we have set forth. i represented a district in queens that is 70% catholic. let me say as well i have been a supporter of public schools, education. that is something we feel very strongly about for the future of the country. this administration over the past several years has gutted the educational programs availabl
and a way that you build up and make a stronger america. with reference to civil rights, i think you have to go beyond that. i think if you look at my record in the congress and fritz mondale's, we both have extremely strong civil rights records. this administration does not. it has come in, in the bob jones ' case, on the side of segregated academies. it came in on the side of discrimination against women, the handicapped, and the elderly. as a matter of fact, in the congress we just passed overwhelmingly the civil rights bill of 1984 in this republican-controlled senate killed it in the last week or two in congress. so there is a real difference how the mondale-ferraro will address the issue of civil rights, particularly in that area. >> in the area of affirmative action, what steps do you think government can take to increase the representation of women and minorities in the work force and in colleges and universities? specifically would you support the use of quotas to achie those goals? >> i do not support the use of quotas. mr. mondale and i feel strongly that affirmative action to
against violence and rape, for equal pay and educational opportunities. on behalf of civil rights and women's rights. we've shown a bright light on women's rights from the powerful economic interest that profit at women's expense to the relishes fundamentalist. in the fall issue of "ms.," we celebrate these 40 years of impactful reporting. from the very first issue, with the abortion petition signed by 53 prominent women who had abortions when they were illegal to repeal our abortion laws. nearly 15 years before anita hill's fame mouse testimony. to our ground beaking reporting that defined genital mutilation as an international crime against women. to our 1996 look inside the taliban's regime before most of the media had even noticed right up to our 2011 story declaring rape is rape in which we revealed the f.b.i.'s 80-year-old definition of rape under counted rapes in this country by hundreds of thousands every year. that was part of a larger feminist campaign and kicked off a fire storm resulting in 140,000 e-mails and letters to the f.b.i. and attorney general demanding the de
, obviously, that she think there should be no civil rights distinction, none whatsoever, between a committed gay couple and a committed heterosexual couple. if that's the case, we really don't have a difference. >> is that what your said? >> your question to him was whether he supported gay marriage and my answer is the same as his and it is that i do not. >> wonderful. you agree. on that note, let's move to foreign policy. [laughter] >> you both have sons who are in iraq or on their way to iraq. you, governor palin, have said that you would like to see a real clear plan for an exit strategy. what should that be, governor? >> i am very thankful that we do have a good plan and the surge and the counterinsurgency strategy in iraq that has proven to work, i am thankful that that is part of the plan implemented under a great american hero, general petraeus, and pushed hard by another great american, senator john mccain. i know that the other ticket opposed this surge, in fact, even opposed funding for our troops in iraq and afghanistan. barack obama voted against funding troops there after promi
thought many long, hard court battles throughout the civil rights era to make sure these groups would not have to disclose their donors to people. so melanie is right that it's odd we are requiring disclosure of little amounts given to candidates, but not large amounts not given to candidates. i am open to adjustments on those. there can be a lot of changes made in offense, but i think there is a fundamental difference there. there has not been a retreat for disclosure. we have never had before in our countries history, tracking people's political activity. he might jump in there. one of the thing that comes to mind is the game has changed, so has the ability to turn around disclosure itemization quickly. that's one of the things that's happening. >> iowa to talk about the irs. i like talking about boring subjects attempt to beat me down like a path that could never get out of. it is supposed to regulate social welfare nonprofits. social welfare nonprofits, 501-c4 groups come in the whole idea of dark money, their primary purpose is supposed to be social welfare, right? they're suppos
's political activities from a fairly young age. >> narrator: his dad thought civil rights were worth fighting for. as a teenager, mitt was less interested in the issues than being with his dad. >> the word from his family is that he was not necessarily interested in politics as ideology. but there was always something about his father and his father's power and his father's profession that kept him around and kept him close in a way that it didn't do that for other members of his family. (newsreel music plays) >> the eyes of the nation are on san francisco as the republican party convenes to nominate its choice for president. >> narrator: and in 1964, mitt traveled with his dad to watch him take on conservative republican senator barry goldwater. >> the republican party should unequivocally repudiate extremists of the right and the left, and reject their efforts to infiltrate or attach themselves to our party or its candidates. >> mitt is absorbing all of this. he sees his father basically taking a stand and admires his father greatly for this. >> narrator: but it was barry goldwater's conven
called the meds extreme. in 2009 the court ruled that new haven connecticut violated the civil rights five-year fighters after the results of a promotion exam because not enough blacks had passed. with liberal leaning justice elena kagan reducing herself a key vote could apply again with justice anthony kennedy as we heard from adam. sandy a democrat. what do you think? >> caller: yes. >> host: what do you think of affirmative action in this case specifically for the court? >> caller: well, first of all i would like to hear the make up and see the makeup of the total top ten when she was denied because we so often have not only racial problems, we can have gender problems as well. so before i want to -- before we get into a big hassle about affirmative action and how we as black people or we as white people as a minority, we are not able to have a fair shot in getting into that college and also listening to the case may be they may need to reform. the racial ethnic of the and a graduate student body this is the university of texas, you can see the makeup in 2010, 2007 over 50% white.
stayed in the background. but she was out front. you know, a champion of women's rights, a champion of trying to create civil society organizations although there were tied to the government and not really dependent. nothing much is independent. the profile of her just before the uprising. they called her the rows of the does of something, the desert rose, which they were very embarrassed about. that is what one of the questions, where has that person gone. people had high hopes. and that is one of the saddest things about that because they really did develop a level of popularity in the country that was not insignificant. difficult to gauge popularity because sometimes the people come out in support of. [indiscernible] they don't want to be seen as not supporting the government's. the security sources all-around. it's rather difficult to see how genuine and sincre this popularity is, but having defended the country quite a bit and gone around, all sorts of people, i really did cents a genuine popularity. for me personally that's one of the saddest things about that. implement a tru
. >> they do that, don't they, with torture? right. does that make it better? >> criminal is very different from civil. and what we -- the precise argument we are making here is that the presumption against application of u.s. law to conduct within foreign sovereigns -- and remember, the purpose of the presumption, justice scalia, is to avoid conflict with foreign sovereigns. there is no foreign sovereign over the high seas. the conflict arises, and the presumption protects against this conflict, when we go into a foreign nation, we project our law. >> i understand that. that's the worst. but i really don't -- you appeal to the general principle of territoriality of our laws. and, as i say, i don't know any other case where that principle allows our securities laws to be applied on the high seas, for example -- >> well -- >> even though they can apply in australia. >> your honor, if you wish to say no extraterritorial application, we think sosa does not foreclose that, because sosa simply said piracy might be one of the actions covered. but i want to get back to the key point, which is -- >
is right for you. [ doctor ] enbrel, the number one biolog medicine prescribed by rheumatologists. >>> more fears that syria's civil war will escalate into a regional fight. for the fifth day in a row syrian army forces are exchanging fire with turkish troops on the border, and in northern syria here's what's happening. syrian troops, they are pushing to retake the key cities of homs and aleppo. opposition activists say at least 76 people have died across syria so far today. this is the suburb of aleppo in northern syria. the person who posted this video on youtube says it shows regime war planes attacking buses there and killing civilians. cnn has no way to independently verify the video. >>> well, empowerment. as children it wasn't a feeling that stella paul or humming bird knew. they didn't know it well at all. they learned find power from within. they broke free from lives of abuse and repression, and now through their work with world pulse and the power of social media they are teaching other women how to do the same. cnn is proud to support world pulse whose mission is to connect wome
are already sending americans to do the job but fewer of them. >> that's right. we're sending in more afghans to do the job. afghans to do the job. >> let's move to another war, the civil war in syria. there are estimates that more than 25,000, 30,000 people have now been killed. in march of last year, president obama explained the military action taken in libya by saying it was in the national interest to go in and prevent further massacres from occurring there. so why doesn't the same logic apply in syria? vice president biden. >> it's a different country. it's a different country. it is five times as large geographically. it has one-fifth the population, that is libya. one-fifth the population, five times as large geographically. it's in a part of the world where they're not going to see whatever would come from that war would seep into a regional war. you are in a country that is heavily populated in the midst of the most dangerous area in the world. and if in fact it blows up and the wrong people gain control, it's going to have impact on the entire region, causing potentially regional w
, but fewer of them. biden: that's right. we're sending in more afghans to do the job. afghans to do the job. >> moderator: let's move to another war, the civil war in syria where there are estimates that more than 25,000, 30,000 people have now been killed. in march of last year, president obama explained the military action taken in libya by saying it was in the national interest to go in and prevent further massacres from occurring there. so why doesn't the same logic apply in syria? biden: different country. it's a different country. it is five times as large geographically. it has one-fifth the population, that is libya, one-fifth the population, five times as large geographically. it's a part of the world where they're not going to see whatever would come from that war seep into a regional war. you're in a country that is heavily populated in the midst of the most dangerous area in the world. and, in fact, if, in fact, it blows up and the wrong people gain control, it's going to have impact on the entire region causing potentially regional wars. we are working hand and glove with the t
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)